Start the Year with National Thank You Month

I can’t locate the origin of why January is National Thank You month, but it is a great theme to start off any New Year with. However, I can provide you with the origin of the term “thank you.”

Depending on your native tongue, the language you use to express praise, recognition, and thanks in, might affect how you thank people. Your language of origin and that language’s root origin for the word “thanks” will determine how you view and practice giving thanks.

How do you view saying thank you to people? Have you thanked your colleagues or employees recently for the positive things they do for you? (more…)

O Great One! A Little Story About the Awesome Power of Recognition (New York: Penguin Random House, 2016)

Novak’s book is all about the amazing difference you can make with giving people recognition.

I love how he dedicates his book to “attacking the recognition deficit that exists in our world today. To all the people out there who are doing great things and deserve to be recognized for it, this story is for you.”

As the former chairman and CEO of YUM! brand restaurants – which includes KFC, Pizza Hut, and Taco Bell – he shares methods he uses to give awesome recognition across a worldwide organization.

He uses a parable-like story, as his approach to teaching 10 principles he advocates for giving meaningful recognition to others. Novak also poses the question and wonders, why aren’t people using recognition more?

He’s on a mission to make recognition a way of life for everyone.

What excites me about this former CEO ‘s philosophy is his describing recognition as a privilege to give, and not something burdensome or added on to your day. Learn as much as you can from this recognition exemplar. A Great One!

Don’t Expect Rewards Just Because I Recognized You

A common problem, and misperception, of some recognized employees, is they believe that afterward, rewards must come their way. Or, perhaps they automatically assume that the recognition received, will guarantee a promotion or a raise at their next performance review. Employees think, “You recognized me so where’s my reward?”

Sometimes it’s the managers and supervisors who hold this attitude. If they think employees have this reward expectation, they often hold back from acknowledging their employees’ work and contributions.

We need to stop this idea that giving people praise and recognition sets employees up for expecting more rewards.

Here are ways for dealing with this employee recognition and rewards dilemma. (more…)

Set clear goals with your employees.

Work with your employees to set behavioral and performance-based expectations so you’ll have short-term performance targets to shoot for. Creating goals gives you an automatic gauge to evaluate performance by and to know what to recognize people for. Always tie your recognition to your Mission, Vision, and Values. This is a key way to drive a successful recognition strategy. Remember, that creating short-term goals, which helps focus people on achieving your Mission, Vision, and Values, can make it easier to catch the everyday behaviors which merit spontaneous recognition.

What Would You Like To Be Recognized For?

 

It’s easy to forget that the people we work with do not necessarily need the same amount or type of recognition as the person next to them does.

Recognition is not a cookie cutter formula. How you like to be recognized will not be the same for me, for example. You should make time to find out what each of your colleagues and employees likes, and dislikes, around their desired recognition preference.

Which also begs the question to discover what everyone likes to be recognized for.

Some people have a greater need for validation of their individual worth and their job performance than others do. You will find this is often the case for new and younger employees. The need for recognition will typically reduce as one matures and is longer in a company.

But perhaps you’ve fallen into the default mode of recognizing absolutely everyone whenever they put forth an extra effort or achieve something significant. Were your attempts at giving recognition really valued and appreciated by each individual? (more…)

Recognition Tip #45: Find out about your employees’ family.

Nothing gets closer to the heart of an employee more often than their family. Know something about each family member and show concern and interest with your asking. Be mindful of your questions in case they should trigger concerns of dysfunctional family dynamics. Express empathy for the employee if there are. Respectfully state why you were asking about their family. Thank them for being candid with you so you at least know.

 

Conscious Awareness of the Importance of Recognition

I am drawing on the principles from Bob Rosen and Emma-Kate Swann’s book Conscious: The Power of Awareness in Business and Life. The opening premise of their book is that being unaware is a big liability.

They highlight some of the observed behaviors that are caused by a lack of conscious awareness. Think about the following actions and see if you’ve experienced any of them too.

  • An unintended (or so they said) offense given to a colleague.
  • Ignoring a customer’s valid complaint about a product.
  • Blindness to the personal needs of a team member.
  • Lack of compassion for a child’s concern shared at home.
  • Uncivil remarks made in a management meeting about a leader.

Research from Tasha Eurich, an organizational psychologist, indicates that only 10 to 15 percent of us are ever truly self-aware of what we do and our abilities.

Why aren’t we changing with giving people the recognition they deserve? From my observation, a lack of awareness of the importance and value that employee recognition has on people’s lives is a big reason why it doesn’t happen frequently enough. (more…)

How To Ask Employees About Their Recognition Preferences

Perhaps you think the idea of asking employees about their recognition preferences is a hard thing to do. Doing so might be the best investment of time you’ll make in connecting better with your employees.

Recognition is such an individual experience that you must encourage everyone in supervisory and management positions to discover how their employee likes and wants to be recognized.

These are some quick suggestions for how to do it and what to ask.

Finding Out

Schedule a 15-minute sit-down meeting for each of your employees and individually ask them about their personal recognition preferences. If they are remote, simply conduct the meeting over the phone or by videoconference.

The secret behind giving more personal and customized recognition is to ask your employees. (more…)