The Impact Your Voice Can Have on the Recognition You Give

Of all the recognition behaviors or practices I have studied, it amazed me that one’s voice ranked as the most important behavior in conveying authentic and effective recognition.

But we couldn’t argue with the content validation exercise conducted with employee recognition experts.

That’s why I want you to learn to better use your voice to communicate more meaningful recognition.

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How To Use “I” Talk Versus “You” Talk in Your Recognition

Bad things can happen when you’re in the wrong place at the wrong time.

Take the scenario of a young man I knew in his twenties making a quick purchase of snack foods and a pop at the local convenience store in the suburbs of Detroit, Michigan. Another man walks in to the store. But this man’s intent is to rob the convenience store of cash from the till.

This second man’s weapon of choice was a screwdriver. He stabbed the young man in the head because he was in the way. The stabbing penetrated his skull and brain resulting in motor brain damage as far as walking and use of his arm. But now he could not talk.

All he could say were approximations of consonant-vowel sounds like, “ma”, “ba”, “do”, or “to”.

This young man’s horrific life experience led me to learn how to give more meaningful recognition expressions using “I” talk language. I’ll explain.

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Top 10 Ways to Leverage Employee Appreciation Day

Employee Appreciation Day is an unofficial holiday (not a day off of work, mind you!) that is observed on the first Friday in March in the United States, Canada, and the United Kingdom. It is a day for company leaders and managers to thank employees for their hard work and effort throughout the year. It was never intended to be the only day you recognize your staff. How can Employee Appreciation Day be a reminder for you to better appreciate the people you work with? Find out how in Top 10 Ways to Leverage Employee Appreciation Day. (more…)

One Thing You Need To Improve Your Recognition

In researching recognition practices and the positive behaviors and principles associated with meaningful recognition, I have identified at least forty essential behaviors needed for giving recognition seen as authentic and effective in the eyes of employees.

My colleague, Dr. Charles Scherbaum, and I have even developed a Recognition Skills Assessment that assesses an individual’s strengths and weaknesses around these researched behaviors.

But over and above all these behaviors, skills, and practices, what’s the one thing you can do to improve your recognition giving abilities? (more…)

Why Being Specific Increases the Value of Recognition

I had just read marketing author, Seth Godin’s blog post, in which he concluded with the line – “Specific can be its own reward”. And I wholeheartedly agree.

Being specific in your expressions of recognition and praise can be a rewarding experience for the recipient. Which is why I want to emphasize the need for this recognition principle to be taught to your managers and employees.

My goal is to encourage you to help those you lead be specific or become more specific with their recognition expressions. (more…)

Start the Year with National Thank You Month

I can’t locate the origin of why January is National Thank You month, but it is a great theme to start off any New Year with. However, I can provide you with the origin of the term “thank you.”

Depending on your native tongue, the language you use to express praise, recognition, and thanks in, might affect how you thank people. Your language of origin and that language’s root origin for the word “thanks” will determine how you view and practice giving thanks.

How do you view saying thank you to people? Have you thanked your colleagues or employees recently for the positive things they do for you? (more…)

O Great One! A Little Story About the Awesome Power of Recognition (New York: Penguin Random House, 2016)

Novak’s book is all about the amazing difference you can make with giving people recognition.

I love how he dedicates his book to “attacking the recognition deficit that exists in our world today. To all the people out there who are doing great things and deserve to be recognized for it, this story is for you.”

As the former chairman and CEO of YUM! brand restaurants – which includes KFC, Pizza Hut, and Taco Bell – he shares methods he uses to give awesome recognition across a worldwide organization.

He uses a parable-like story, as his approach to teaching 10 principles he advocates for giving meaningful recognition to others. Novak also poses the question and wonders, why aren’t people using recognition more?

He’s on a mission to make recognition a way of life for everyone.

What excites me about this former CEO ‘s philosophy is his describing recognition as a privilege to give, and not something burdensome or added on to your day. Learn as much as you can from this recognition exemplar. A Great One!

Don’t Expect Rewards Just Because I Recognized You

A common problem, and misperception, of some recognized employees, is they believe that afterward, rewards must come their way. Or, perhaps they automatically assume that the recognition received, will guarantee a promotion or a raise at their next performance review. Employees think, “You recognized me so where’s my reward?”

Sometimes it’s the managers and supervisors who hold this attitude. If they think employees have this reward expectation, they often hold back from acknowledging their employees’ work and contributions.

We need to stop this idea that giving people praise and recognition sets employees up for expecting more rewards.

Here are ways for dealing with this employee recognition and rewards dilemma. (more…)

Set clear goals with your employees.

Work with your employees to set behavioral and performance-based expectations so you’ll have short-term performance targets to shoot for. Creating goals gives you an automatic gauge to evaluate performance by and to know what to recognize people for. Always tie your recognition to your Mission, Vision, and Values. This is a key way to drive a successful recognition strategy. Remember, that creating short-term goals, which helps focus people on achieving your Mission, Vision, and Values, can make it easier to catch the everyday behaviors which merit spontaneous recognition.