Recognition Tip #45: Find out about your employees’ family.

Nothing gets closer to the heart of an employee more often than their family. Know something about each family member and show concern and interest with your asking. Be mindful of your questions in case they should trigger concerns of dysfunctional family dynamics. Express empathy for the employee if there are. Respectfully state why you were asking about their family. Thank them for being candid with you so you at least know.

 

Conscious Awareness of the Importance of Recognition

I am drawing on the principles from Bob Rosen and Emma-Kate Swann’s book Conscious: The Power of Awareness in Business and Life. The opening premise of their book is that being unaware is a big liability.

They highlight some of the observed behaviors that are caused by a lack of conscious awareness. Think about the following actions and see if you’ve experienced any of them too.

  • An unintended (or so they said) offense given to a colleague.
  • Ignoring a customer’s valid complaint about a product.
  • Blindness to the personal needs of a team member.
  • Lack of compassion for a child’s concern shared at home.
  • Uncivil remarks made in a management meeting about a leader.

Research from Tasha Eurich, an organizational psychologist, indicates that only 10 to 15 percent of us are ever truly self-aware of what we do and our abilities.

Why aren’t we changing with giving people the recognition they deserve? From my observation, a lack of awareness of the importance and value that employee recognition has on people’s lives is a big reason why it doesn’t happen frequently enough. (more…)

How To Ask Employees About Their Recognition Preferences

Perhaps you think the idea of asking employees about their recognition preferences is a hard thing to do. Doing so might be the best investment of time you’ll make in connecting better with your employees.

Recognition is such an individual experience that you must encourage everyone in supervisory and management positions to discover how their employee likes and wants to be recognized.

These are some quick suggestions for how to do it and what to ask.

Finding Out

Schedule a 15-minute sit-down meeting for each of your employees and individually ask them about their personal recognition preferences. If they are remote, simply conduct the meeting over the phone or by videoconference.

The secret behind giving more personal and customized recognition is to ask your employees. (more…)

What Happens When You Recognize A Poor Team Player

Someone brought up a topic I have heard many times before in a presentation I gave this week.

How do you handle recognizing team members when there is a “rotten apple” of a team member on the team? You know what they’re talking about. They’re referring to the poor performer who is not pulling their weight on the team. Yet, they get included in the positive acknowledgments when the project is done.

The bottom-line? They don’t deserve the recognition lauded on the entire team. (more…)

Top 10 Ways To Make Great Employees Feel Like Stars

Our companies have oodles of great employees who deserve red carpet treatment. We need to make sure we celebrate their achievements and recognize their hard work and contributions. Many of our employees quietly, and consistently, perform amazing work behind the scenes. Apply these Top 10 Ways and make your great employees feel like stars. (more…)

Showing Managers How To Give Great Recognition

It’s the reason I started my company in educating and training managers over twenty years ago. I saw that no one was showing managers how to give meaningful and effective recognition to their employees.

Oh, there were a lot of memos and mandates from on high. Senior leaders would always tell managers to say “thank you” more often. This was always triggered following the latest employee satisfaction or engagement survey revealing low scores with employee recognition.

You probably know the proverb from the Chinese philosopher, Confucius that states, “I hear and I forget. I see and I remember. I do and I understand.”

This has been the catalyst for why managers can have a hard time giving recognition. Followed through to the end it is also the key solution. (more…)

Find the right time and place for recognition.

Make sure to give everyday recognition at a time that does not interfere with or impede work. And strive to know the individual’s recognition preferences and respect their wishes. Don’t perpetrate a recognition ambush that is totally unwelcomed! Even instant recognition may need to be scheduled into the day – even if only for 10 or 15 minutes. That way all work colleagues and project participants can dedicate their focus on the individual or team. Give the full attention that these recognition moments deserve.

Are You Being Praised and Recognized Regularly Enough?

You are probably aware how the Gallup Q12 Index asks a great recognition related question in their measure of employee engagement.

They ask the question, “In the last seven days, have you received recognition or praise for doing good work?”

So let’s pretend your company conducts the Gallup Q12 survey or a similar evaluation tool. A year later nothing has changed with your lack of recognition. What are you then supposed to do then?

I think we’ve created a very dependent and needy world. We are too dependent on our smartphone notifications and automated communications. There’s perhaps an entitlement mentality where we’re thinking others are always expected to do things to us, or for us.

But what if the recognition and praise doesn’t come your way? Is there anything you can do to correct this?

My goal in this post is to put you in charge of getting the praise and recognition you deserve when you want it. (more…)

The Exciting Beginning of Every Recognition Experience

There’s too much reliance upon recognition program data and engagement survey results as the source for trying to make recognition better.

All these metrics do is tell you what happened with recognition a month ago, six-months, or a year back. We don’t do a very good job with this hindsight learning. And we rarely stop to ask ourselves questions about these measurements. Nor do we plan well and take action on the data we collect.

These “output” oriented metrics are easy to measure. If you use a recognition program this is noted and recorded. Check. For engagement surveys, you answer each question using a Likert scale response, such as I feel valued and appreciated for the work I do at that particular point in time. Strongly agree.

When was that again? The program I used last month and the last engagement survey was 8 months ago. Measures like this are referred to as lagging indicators because they lag behind the occurrence of the recognition experience. A problem with lagging indicators is they are hard to improve upon or influence because they are in the past.

Let’s stop looking at retroactive memories of what caused someone to be recognized. My suggestion for improving recognition is to ask what happens before every recognition experience? Think about it.

Are you ready to see what you can do to improve the frequency of recognition being given to everyone where you work? (more…)