How To Get Amazing, Everyday Recognition Happening in 3 Easy Steps

Many of the attendees at my breakout session at the recent Human Resource Professionals Association were committed to wanting to improve employee recognition practices and their recognition programs where they worked.

One person submitted a question to me asking, “What would be the first 3 steps to take to start with Real Recognition?”

I am going to outline the three steps I would recommend you start with to make everyday, recognition – and specifically Real Recognition® – happen throughout your organization.

These steps are only easy if you commit to asking the hard questions of one another, being vulnerable enough to hear people’s responses, and then having the courage to act upon them. (more…)

Do You Really Recognize Poor Performing Employees?

Whenever you are dealing with people in the workplace you will always need to address performance on the job.

There are 2 sides of the performance coin. It is either good performance or its poor performance.

With employee recognition, I often get asked questions about recognizing poor performers. Recently, I was asked, “How do you recognize a poor performing employee without encouraging mediocrity?”

You know they have someone in mind when they ask this question. Consider the following questions to help guide you on this subject. (more…)

How to Effectively Emote When People Are Remote

In the ever-evolving nature of the modern workplace, you can have far less face-to-face encounters with your staff and peers than you would like to. This makes giving personal and meaningful recognition a little more challenging.

Employee recognition is a felt phenomenon to begin with, so it must be given with feeling.

I was recently asked how could we emote better in our dialogue and written feedback with people?

I will examine these two areas of verbal and written communication and share my recommendations. (more…)

How To Make An Effective Formal Awards Program

I was recently in a meeting with an organization who wanted to design a formal awards program and I think they were surprised with the additional insights I brought to the table that they hadn’t considered before.

I will outline a few of the critical elements needed for creating an effective formal awards program. These areas will be covered under five broad steps that entail quite a bit of work for each one.

Each of these steps will help you whether a manually administered awards program or one simplified through technology. (more…)

Practice recognition giving on daily basis.

Strive to give recognition every day to help you gain confidence in this skill. Research shows managers who recognize regularly have higher results from their employees than those managers who are not consistent recognizers. Don’t worry if you stumble through your first few spontaneous recognition expressions. The important thing is, you tried your best, and the next time will be even better. Like anything in life, perfect practice always makes perfect.

Why Learning About Recognition Needs To Be More Strategic

Learning about effective employee recognition practices and skills requires developing clear, behaviourally focused learning objectives.

But I find there is a problem in most organizations. When I ask how much focus is given to recognition practices in their leadership or management development curriculum the answer is often zilch.

Or at best they talk about recognition and motivation at the 30,000 feet level with no practical skills, know-how, or insights on how to get better at giving recognition.

Yet these organizational leaders are concerned when employee engagement survey results reveal poor, or at least below average, employee perceptions of the recognition given. (more…)

Grow A Recognition Giving Mindset One Day At A Time

You hear a lot about mindfulness these days.

Mindfulness is a therapeutic technique for creating a conscious awareness of being in the present moment.

Now, if you couple mindfulness with employee recognition, you will have a greater awareness of the things people are doing around you that merit being acknowledged and appreciated.

By creating more empathetic feelings toward the people you work with you can also show more caring concern for the positive and negative life events that affect them and their families.

You can become better at acknowledging and accepting your own thoughts and feelings, having an environmental awareness, all in a non-judgmental way.

It only takes a few things each day to keep a recognition focus. (more…)

How to Make Recognition Giving a Part of Your DNA

You and I need to learn how to truly value people and their contributions.

When we respect and acknowledge people properly for the effort they make, giving recognition demonstrates our respect for them and shows they are truly worthy of our time.

I have written before how giving recognition does not take very much time to do. Yet, it is the number one reason, or barrier, for why people don’t give recognition.

Making recognition a part of your DNA – means following a consistent, systematic approach to how, and when, you give people recognition.

(more…)

Never Let Organizational Culture Eat Up Your Strategy

Many years ago the late business management guru, Peter Drucker, purportedly said, “Culture eats strategy for breakfast.”

While there is still debate as to whether Drucker actually said the line or not, it was attributed to him by Mark Fields in 2006, and he later became the chief executive of the Ford Motor Company.

At the time Drucker probably made this statement there was a lot of talk about business strategy in the Ivy League business schools.

His point was well taken that you should never neglect culture.

However, as the authors Boris Groysberg, Jeremiah Lee, Jesse Price and J. Yo-Jud Cheng, of the recent Harvard Business Review article on The Leader’s Guide to Corporate Culture, point out, a strong organizational culture can be detrimental when misaligned with strategy. (more…)

Recognition Tip #42: Take time to ask people for their recognition preferences.

Create an informal sit-down opportunity and learn about an individual’s goals and what motivates them at work. When the comfort level is present, ask them what they like and don’t like with the recognition they receive from you. Discover their preferred frequency of recognition and how they best like to be appreciated.