Prepare yourself when recognizing people.

Take time to do some advance preparation before recognizing someone. Even think out 
or write down some notes about what you will specifically thank or appreciate the individual for. Impromptu public speaking comes naturally to very few – and that’s okay. A few well thought out sentiments prepared ahead of time will take the pressure off you as the presenter and make the person and their positive actions the focal point of the moment.

Discover each person’s recognition preferences.

Find out specifically how each person wants to be recognized. Discover what they like to receive for recognition. Learn their likes and dislikes and keep a record for future recognition moments. Not everyone is comfortable with giving or receiving public recognition so make sure you ask about that. Remember, what’s important here, is to respect and be considerate of people’s feelings. When you do this the right way you will create memorable, meaningful and motivational recognition experiences.

Reward commensurate with the achievement.

Give an appropriate valued gift or reward level that fits the performance achieved. The beauty of instant rewards is that these awards are often very affordable and enables you to recognize or reward people more often. Strive to make sure you select awards that are also symbolic of the behavior you are recognizing.

Keep a pulse of how recognized people feel.

Simply ask employees whether 
they actually feel recognized and valued for their contributions. Ask them in one-on-one meetings or through online survey pulse checks. Recognition is a relationship experience and a felt phenomenon. So recognition program outputs alone do not always equate with employees feeling recognized. You have to capture the subjective and qualitative measures as well. Ask them if they feel recognized.

Show people that you care.

Caring can mean having the most meaningful people present when you give people recognition. You don’t need to organize
 a formal banquet to create a memorable recognition experience. A few of the recipient’s immediate friends and fellow coworkers who they work closely with can help heighten the total recognition experience.

Make Recognition Authentic

You make recognition giving authentic by being true to yourself in recognizing people. It is all about making genuine eye contact, being very specific with what the person accomplished, and telling them how what they did made a difference to others. Create a connection with the person you are recognizing and don’t let external factors distract from the recognition experience.

Prepare yourself to give recognition

Take time to do some advance preparation in thinking out or writing down some notes to specifically thank and appreciate an individual. Impromptu public speaking comes naturally to very few and that’s okay. A few well thought out sentiments, prepared ahead of time, will take the pressure off of you as the presenter and make the person and their actions being recognized the focal point of the moment.

Discover each person’s recognition preferences

Find out what each employee likes and dislikes with how they are recognized and what they personally like to receive for recognition. Not everyone is comfortable with either giving or receiving very public recognition. Remember what’s important is to be sincere and considerate of people’s feelings. A caring gesture by honoring their preferences will always be well received.

Keep a pulse of how recognized people feel.

Simply ask employees employees whether they feel recognized and valued for their contributions, in a one-on-one meeting or through a survey like tool. Recognition is really a relationship based and a felt phenomenon. So recognition outputs alone do not always equate with employees actually feeling recognized. You have to capture the subjective and qualitative measures as well. Bottom line: Ask if they feel recognized.

Measure every recognition action you do.

Remember to keep track of things like the people recognized, the performance and behaviours demonstrated, and frequency of recognition. We have all heard the phrase “if you can’t measure it you can’t manage it”. Same is true with rewards and recognition. Know what is happening, where and why, and all the recognition outputs that occur. Then you can replicate the same great results elsewhere in the organization.