How To Improve Employee Retention Through Recognition

Improving employee retention is a constant concern of leaders and Human Resource professionals.

One of the tools available to leaders to change turnover issues is employee recognition.

Let’s examine how employee recognition can be a gamechanger in turning around your retention issues.

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Could Witnesses to Recognition Be More Likely To Stay?

Imagine if simply witnessing other people receiving recognition could cause employees to stay working for your company longer and increase their loyalty and productivity.

I am going to refer to a scientific study that does not focus on employee recognition but has some interesting and practical significance for recognition giving.

I read this study a while ago from the University of British Columbia called Escaping Bullying: The Simultaneous Impact of Individual and Unit-Level Bullying on Turnover Intentions (Human Relations, July 2012 vol. 65 no. 7, 901-918).

This study obviously addresses the extreme opposite of such positive practices as employee recognition, and tackles the not so nice topic of bullying.

What the study found was when individuals not directly bullied themselves were witnesses (indirectly or directly) to others being bullied they were more likely to leave their workplace than those directly bullied.

Think about the implications this could have on positive behaviours of praise and recognition. (more…)

Why Recognize Them When They’re Just Doing Their Job?

One of the standard complaints against recognition that some people make, is if people are doing their jobs, why do you need to recognize them?

A good friend of mine likens this to someone saying, “I love you!” to their partner when they propose to them and then never saying it again. When the partner desperately asks after a year together, “How come you never say how much you love me anymore?” the response is simply, “I told you when I first proposed. Why do I have to say it again?”

It get’s worse when the diehard cynics in the room confront the need for employee recognition by saying things like, “We pay them well enough, what more do they want?”

Yet, for many people, though not everyone, there is an inherent need to feel that they’re making a difference. They want to know that their contributions are valued and appreciated by others.

I am going to tackle this question the best way I can by painting a picture and letting you decide.

Remember the question: Should you be recognizing people when they are “just doing their job?” (more…)